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20110301
20110331
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cashflow situation. pnc. for the achiever in us all. >>> tonight on "world news," sudden death. another high school athlete collapses and dies. and tonight, startling numbers. it happens nearly once a week. some doctors say more often than that. this evening, a checklist for parents. >>> untapped. the dramatic step the white house is considering about gasoline and those skyrocketing prices. would it work? is this an emergency? >>> a reality check from libya tonight. our two correspondents on two dramatic headlines. colonel gadhafi taking back territory, rebel forces gaining ground. who has the upper hand? >>> several republican presidential contenders making waves. >>> and, up to snuff. the puppies tearing through your things. and why, this time, it's perfectly okay. >>> good evening on this sunday. when the headline crossed this weekend, we immediately thought, not again. a child athlete, this time, a 17-year-old rugby player, collapsing and dying on the field near denver. it comes just days after that 16-year-old basketball player in michigan. and tonight, a startling number found by
sides digging in. the colonel and the rebels. what if anything should the u.s. do now? >>> the latest singer to give back the gadhafi money. >>> the cold case cracked, the man who targeted women for more than a decade and the one simple move this week that got him caught. >>> made in america. thousands of you writing in from the firefighter's uniform to the kindergarten class to the discovery at the golden gate bridge. what all of you found. >>> good evening on this saturday. like clock work, the spike in twisters we see every year when we start the month of march returned in devastating force. one tearing through a louisiana town flipping a mail truck like a toy. snapping utility poles. the power is out tonight in more than 100 homes damaged. we've now learned of one death, a mother trying to save her child. the tornado is part of a massive storm system. there are flood warnings and watches in 20 states from the mississippi river to the hudson river. meteorologist chikage windler leads us off. >> reporter: three suspected tornados touched down within 15 minutes of each other in south
to church could be making us overweight. zblifl and amazing grace. the unthinkable obstacles facing this bride to be. but she is determined to walk down that aisle. >>> and good evening. we begin tonight with startling n numbers about a super bug spreading. it's one of our biggest fears. the fear they'll catch one of those infections that antibiotics can't fight. tonight, it's all hands on deck at several hospitals to stop this from spreading. yunji de nies is in los angeles. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, david. health officials here in los angeles were stunned to find this brand new infection spreading. it is deadly and it is now surfacing across the country. and even our most powerful medicines, like this cipro, are unable to stop it. it may be the most dangerous super bug to date, spreading through hospitals, nursing homes and short-term care facilities. officials in southern california now identify more than 350 cases. people becoming gravely ill from this new infection known as crkp. steve winters knows just how powerful is super bugs can be. he took his 80-year-old
perfume. but her humanitarian work may be her greatest legacy. using her fame, she raised millions for aids research, standing by rock hudson, one of its first victims, when others shunned him. to the public, she may have been the last great movie star. but for those who knew her, she was also a loving mother and loyal friend. >> there have been so many lessons, life and death lessons, emotional lessons. i don't believe in regrets. and i have no idea what's going to happen tomorrow, no one does. >> and barbara walters is here now. we were saying earlier, we don't think of her as a pioneer, but her sheer fearlessness about her own choices in life changed things in this country. >> reporter: absolutely. by the way, she never wrote her all biography. this, all the different clips that people will see, that's her all biography. she was gutsy and salty and funny. look at what we talked about. married eight times, she wanted to get married, she married them. she wanted to divorce them, she divorced them. she jumped into aids when nobody did. she stood by people who were rejected. michael
the president to flood the market with some of the u.s. strategic petroleum reserve, with 727 million barrels of oil, it's the largest on the planet. >> i do believe that the announcement of a strategic petroleum reserve sale would help to moderate escalating prices. >> reporter: but experts differ on how much of a real impact that oil would have on gas prices. >> a lot of what's happening is fear. what could go wrong? but maybe it reduces a little bit of that fear. >> reporter: the president's response? not yet. and diane, unless things in the middle east worsen, analysts tell us that these gas price hikes will probably take a bite out of the economic recovery but probably won't cripple it. diane? >> okay, matt. something else is heading higher today, as well, welcome news. jobs. a strong 192,000 new jobs added last month. unemployment dropping to 8.9 percent. david muir is checking in. >> reporter: for millions of americans this has been a very long road back to finding a job. and all of us have been watching that one number, the average time to find a job. 37 weeks now. but tonight, these
prices in the same towns, so why is this happening and how do you find the best deal, steve joins us from atlanta. steve, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, diane. we did a little comparison shopping today and at current prices, two gallons of gas is roughly the same cost as this t-bone, the gas it takes to get you to the steak house is now more than the beef. outside chicago, autumn says it's unreal. in the past two weeks she's watched gas jump up 45 cents a gallon and she nearly fell over when it cost her $64 to fill up. today we went with her as she and her children made all of their trips in one drive spending as little time on the road as possible. >> i was really shocked when it didn't stop till 68.04. >> reporter: outside atlanta when they do go shopping mark and lisa mcintire told us they buy much more in bulk and drive to the store slowly to help save on gas. >> you got to drive a little slower sometimes too. >> reporter: really? >> of course. you save. >> reporter: you do this? >> yeah, i do. >> reporter: the average cost is 3.52. just 2.35 of that buys the oil and 35 cent
of the skies. so what's next for u.s. forces and what will gadhafi do now? >>> radiation in food from japan. >> fukushima fresh vegetables. >> we do our own tests. >>> and an american family after ten days of hope learns their daughter was lost trying to save others. >>> men, women and jobs. which sex is getting 90% of the new jobs and why? >>> and sibling secrets. are you an older or younger sibling? news by which order gives you an edge in health and happiness. >>> good evening, as we come on the air tonight beginning this week together the united states is still in the middle of an international assault on moammar gadhafi's libya. but the battle is moving at breakneck speed. it is called "operation odyssey dawn" and as of tonight the skies are clear. gadhafi's forces have come to a halt though there are still big questions. how soon can the u.s. hand over the lead to other countries? who are these libyan rebels and are we even on the same side? and what is next? will gadhafi fold or could this go on for years? we have team coverage from washington to libya beginning with martha raddatz o
with secretary of state hillary clinton about the u.s. intervention in libya, how we got involved and how it will end. but we bring you a headline tonight. are there signs that colonel moammar gadhafi and those close to him may be trying to find an exit, even though gadhafi appeared on television, promising to win? also, as abc news has reported on "good morning america," libyan dip low malts say at least one of gadhafi's sons may now have been killed by a libyan pilot on a kamikaze mission so, here is what secretary clinton told us today about gadhafi and the report about his sons. there's a report that two of gadhafi's sons, at least one, but maybe two, have been killed. can you confirm this? >> well, i can't confirm it, but we've heard it. and we've heard a lot. >> reporter: credibly? >> well, we hear it from many different sources. and that's why i can't confirm it. i can't give confirmation because, you know, the evidence is not sufficient. but we've heard that. we heard about other people close to him reaching out to people that they know around the world, africa, the middle east, e
for the u.s. to hand over a huge part of that bold operation over libya. and tonight, an abc news exclusive. martha raddatz with extraordinary access. behind me, you're looking at the "usskearsarge." martha spending hours on board with the american commander. tonight, the latest on these new u.s. plans to hand over partial control and she has ne details about the rescue of those u.s. pilots ejecting from 22,000 feet and tough questions for the commander. will this operation be a success in the end? martha landed back at a u.s. base in italy just a short time ago and has the latest. >> reporter: good evening, david. there are a lot of details to be worked out about that nato plan, but we did spend a remarkable day jumping from warship to warship with the man currently in charge. general carter ham took charge of africa command on march 9th. ten days later, he was at war. and now, he is here, in the middle of the fight, touring the u.s. warships off the coast in libya. he brought the sailors and marines some encouragement from their commander in chief -- >> he said, how are the attacks going?
gays have a right to do it. >>> terror attack a gunman shouting in arabic opens fire on u.s. troops at an airport in germany. >>> and, made in america. the family who said we could take away everything in their house made overseas, stunned by the truth. tonight, we show them how it looks when we buy only from workers here at home. >>> good evening. they are our parents, our neighbors and we learned today that by the millions they are vulnerable to a kind of invisible elder abuse. it was all brought home by the original all-american kid in the old time movies, mickey rooney who is now 90 years old. he silenced the room on capitol hill of his story of financial abuse, bullying and shake. adding, if it can happen to him, it can happen to anyone. and abc's claire shipman watched it all today. >> reporter: diane, it is estimated that as many as 3.5 million americans are victims of elder abuse. it does have a broad definition. it can be physical abuse, neglect, sheer theft, which is what mickey rooney talked about in his wrenching testimony, where he said all of them can cause devastating
, schools and money. well, today, bill gates, whose foundation spends hundreds of millions of dollars on u.s. schools, called out state officials for incompetence, wasting money and making grave mistakes about teaching american kids to succeed. and roin clal born is here with what was really a wakeup call. >> reporter: that's right. it's not often that bill gates inserts himself into one of the hot button issues of american politics. but he is doing that now, voicing radical ideas on how to make schools work and sharp criticism for who is to blame. at today's conference, gates was on the attack over how states are dealing with the crisis in american education. >> the guys at enron never would have done this. i mean, this is so blatant. so extreme. is anyone paying attention? >> reporter: for the past year, gates has been focused on how to make schools and teachers better. and how to pay for it. >> state budgets are a critical topic, because here's where we make the real trade-offs. if we make the wrong choices, education won't be funded the right way. >> reporter: gates has been looking into
. >>> the women versus walmart. the case at the supreme court, and the worker who told us today she was told to dust off the makeup, to doll up, to get a promotion. >>> getting answers. more than 5 billion text messages every day in this country. so, why can't we text 911? and couldn't those messages help save lives? >>> and, cobra chaos at the big zoo. a great escape. the poisonous snake missing tonight. >>> good evening. as we come on the air this sunday night, the pressure is mounting against colonel gadhafi. jetting pounds not only tripoli but gadhafi's hometown. while here at home, the pressure is building for president obama as members of congress and many across this country ask, why is the u.s. part of this operation? his own defense secretary telling abc news today this is not a vital national interest. so, as the president prepares to address the nation tomorrow, can he convince americans that the u.s. should be involved in this operation? as the u.s. hands over power to nato what is the end game for american forces? and will there be a deal with gaffedy if to get him out? david ke
can come true for all of us. >> the first woman nominated for vice president. the barriers broken. we go back to that one moment on the stage. what geraldine ferraro couldn't do then but it changed after. >>> target libya, a libyan woman pleading for help. four of gadhafi's police hustle her away. >>> nuclear nightmare, an ominous turn in japan. radiation found miles out to sea, growing fears the crack in the reactor will only grow. >>> changing course, the unexpected 180, tonight why suze orman is changing her tune on the american dream. >>> one cool concert, literally. they practically built a symphony from ice. >> good evening, we begin tonight with the trailblazer we lost today. before hillary clinton, before sarah palin, there was geraldine ferraro, the first woman to be nominated for vice president. the year was 1984, ferraro, a little known member of congress from queens, new york, was chosen by walter mondale to be his running meat. they lost, but ferraro walked out that night in san francisco and never left. showing how a mother and grandmother could balance her life at home
. >> i think the problem is the rain, the snow melt, the dam up river. it never used to get this bad. >> reporter: northern new jersey rivers are overflowing their banks. a potent combination of three inches of rain and massive snow melt. all the rainfall in little falls is proving too much. >> really nothing i can do, but i'm stressed. i'm stressed. >> reporter: melting snow brought mud slides to massachusetts and in connecticut, the majority of state's rivers have surpassed flood stage. >> we have about a foot and a half of water inside the house. the entire living space is completely trashed. we can't -- we have nowhere to live right now. >> reporter: this man traversed the icy waters with a canoe. with cars underwater, firefighters had to use boats to rescue residents. >> it was pretty bad. my electrical wire underneath was in water, so i shut down my power and i left and went to my mom's. >> reporter: the worst may be still to come. another storm is brewing in the south. it's expected to dump another one to two inches starting tomorrow. paul wayne has work to to do. not a river,
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14